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photo video

4K is for Suckers

Instead, you should take this 8K glory video of The Milky Way from Nikon.  Yes, it’s quite something, though parts of it look just a bit too surreal.  Like they were rendered.

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awesome photo video

Crazy Difficult Time-Lapse of NYC

Julian Tryba has a pretty neat Time-Lapse, or layer-lapse as they call it, of New York City:

I admit, that was pretty ace.  Each scene in the video has as many as 300 different layers, all being independently turned on and off to the beat of the music.  A time-lapse done well to music is better than any other boring time-lapse.  This one is pretty dang impressive.  Even more so considering it consists of over 230,000 different photos, spanning over 350 hours of life.  Though, I imagine some of that might have been duplicated with multiple lenses on multiple cameras at the same location.  Either way, it’s a great 2 and a half minutes of your life, trust me.

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electronic news photo science video

Pure Photos

Photographer Robin de Puy teamed up with Spa, and spent 6 months developing the technique to take photographs through a drop of water.  It’s quite something to be honest, though it’s wildly impractical.  In order to get it working, they had to use a Teflon coated glass plate, an electrical current, and mirrors.  It’s all neat and everything, but it’s not for the real world unfortunately.

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awesome science video

Watching the Stars

Here are two time-lapses of the night sky from two very different perspectives.   The first one is the standard watch the stars pass by overhead in a circle around the viewer.  It’s pretty nice, Aryeh Nirenberg created it by leaving his camera on all night on Assateague Island in Maryland.

I do enjoy watching the stars pass by, it’s quite relaxing.  This next video is a different take on the tradition.  The stars are moving because the earth is moving through space, and rotating around it’s axis.  Most people experience this by having the foreground stationary and letting the stars spin.  AlphaPhoenix reversed that and has the stars stationary and the foreground rotating around Polaris, the North Star.

It’s actually, quite dizzying to be honest.  I’m not a fan of it.

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photo science video

Orion Over Sky

Sriram Murali created the above video to show the effects that light pollution has on the beautiful night sky.  In it, he focuses on the constellation Orion, and how our perception of it changes based on the light density of the area we view it from.  The entire thing is a great example of one of the major downfalls of city life – loss of the night sky.  However, the entire thing also does suffer from a major unintended side-effect.  In order to take impressive night sky shots, you must take long exposure photos.  In the process of taking those photos, and in the post-processing necessary on them, you get many more stars visible than the human eye usually sees.  That makes the darker skies even more impressive in the time-lapse.

Regardless, it’s still a good teaching tool.  Hopefully you take the time to drive 100 miles from the city where you live to really experience the night sky!

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awesome photo strange video

Infrared Timelapse

I do love some Infrared photography.  There’s something awesome and other-worldly about it that is so enticing.  This time-lapse of Oregon is done completely in infrared.  I will say, some of the shots are pretty lost.  The nightscapes, and the meh mountainsides, those just look like filtered B&W.  There are a few nice sections of Crater Lake though, those came out neat.

All in all, it’s not bad at 6:48 seconds long, you should watch it, time-lapses are generally beautiful experiences.

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awesome photo video

The Photo’s Rise

For over 150 years The New York Times has been the pre-emetitive news paper of the United States.  Yes, in recent times it has started to lean more towards the left, but it still presents mostly all sides of a story.  I won’t get into the politics of the paper, that’s not worth the effort.  What I do want to talk about is the above “time-lapse” put together by Josh Begley. In it he shows how the photograph became an ever increasing part of the front page.  It’s quite soothing, and at under a minute long, it’s worth watching.  Besides the rise of the photograph, the ever increasing text that appears along the headline was interesting to me too.  I wish he overlaid a year marker, this way you could get an idea of when certain events happened.

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awesome video

HD B&W Storms

Black and White is an often overlooked area of photography.  Especially when time-lapse storm footage is done.  There’s something about shooting in black and white that gives everything a more mysterious, serious, yet fantasy look.  Mike Olbinski shot the entire sequence in black and white.  Yes, there is some post-processing work done, but it’s natural black and white (as natural as a digital camera can be that is).

My favorite sequence is about 2 and a half minutes in, when clouds roll across the sky, then the sun starts coming through, and things get brighter, and more detailed.  I also love watching the clouds for out of nowhere, water vapor collecting, winds combining, clouds being born.  Storms are amazing to watch like this, safe in the comfort of your own home with soothing music playing in the background.

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awesome electronic news photo video

360° DSLR

You know that I love 360° video and photo.  I think it’s the next big thing in the world of photography.  Up until now the only way to get really high quality content was to attach multiple cameras together in rigs and stitch the resulting footage after the fact.  That’s all changing now.  Sphere is a new lens that takes a full 360° by 180° image in a single frame.

This looks like it could be a game changer.  However, it looks like it will cost just as much money as a multi-camera rig.  Unfortunately most modern affordable DSLRs do not shoot 4K video (the photos themselves are over 4K resolution), and 360° is best viewed in the highest resolution possible, usually 4K is a minimum requirement.  However, since it’s a lens, as camera technology improves over time, this lens will still be useful.

No pricing is announced, you have to make inquiries.  You can rent it out though.  Something I might be interested in doing one day.

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awesome DIY science video

A Super Fast GoPro!

YouTube users Sam and Niko together with their team at Corridor Digital 3-D printed an arrow casing for a GoPro.  They then placed it into an air cannon and fired it. It went better than expected.  The initial launch was successful, but the follow up straight up resulted in a broken GoPro. Not to worry, they had extras so they tried again.  They calculated the speed to be about 84 miles per hour.  Though, I don’t like their usage of Google Maps to estimate the distance the GoPro traveled.  It was only about 400 feet, they were in a field, they could have easily measured that themselves.  Anyway, that’s the difference between real scientists, and people having fun.

After it was all said and done, they stabilized the video.  You can see that towards the end above.  It’s not terrible, though it is nauseating to watch I think.  I’d rather watch the native one personally.  They could probably fix this by changing the aspect ration the camera shoots to square, or more square than the 1080p or 4k quality it’s currently set at.

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