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awesome DIY video

Deter Package Theives

I like Mark Rober, some of his videos are cool, some are awkward, most are enjoyable.  This one is really interesting he goes into how he stalked his package thieves, then how he enlisted the help of his friend to design and build a glitter+fart bombing dummy package.

I don’t want to spoil anything, but the best part is the ending.  You can trust me and him when he says that it’s over-engineered and just get to the goods.

He clearly built a few of these, if he were smart next year he will start offering them for sale for people.  Though I do wonder how cost-effective it actually is given the 4 phones he might have lost forever and the LTE data plans he paid for them.  Granted, I’m sure they were burners, but still.

Categories
computer Deadly Computer internet

Server Issues

I thought that I had everything worked out, but it seems like there are still issues with the new server.  There was a power blip this morning.  For realz, half a second of no power to restart everything (apparently the server is not plugged into the UPS, I should fix that).  The server started up perfectly fine, but the shared folders within the VMs didn’t mount properly.  I thought it was something I could remote into and fix but there was something else wrong and I needed to wait until I got home from work to fix it.

Ugh, never a dull moment here.

Categories
computer electronic news science strange

Alternate History Thursday: Now What Indeed?

Yes, what to do now?  Panic had not ensued yet, though as the day wore on, people were loosing their patience.  A storm was on the horizon for January 03, and people didn’t know if it was still coming, or if it had been blown out to sea.  By 1pm, the Governor of New York declared a State of Emergency, though no one knew it.  The tunnels connecting Manhattan had to be closed and evacuated as the big computer controlled fans had stopped working hours before and deadly exhaust fumes were collecting in them.

Of the surrounding states, only Vermont and Pennsylvania had enacted the proper protections against the bugs.  That didn’t matter much however, as both states were in their own state of emergencies battling the borders.  This wasn’t the dark ages, and this is America after all.  Both states allowed their neighbors to come in for assistance, however, rations needed to be set up, and priority had to be established.

That winter storm that was on the horizon, it came with a vengeance. Twenty-seven inches of snow fell on New York City over the course of 17 hours.   In reality, this was a good thing because it kept most of the populace inside.  With NYC being an old city, much of the heat was powered by older steam boilers with not a computer in sight.  The gas lines to many of them came from private pipe-lines controlled by companies that hardened their systems from attack, and NY being the kind place it is, those without heat were welcome where it was plentiful.

By the end of the week, new equipment was finally distributed to enough people for accurate information to start to be spread.  The President of the United States of America had addressed the nation, and the world confirming the Y2K bug.  This was lucky confirmation to many, though some still felt that the government was hiding the real truth.

What could that real truth be?  Anything really.  However, I’ll let you know a spoiler, Y2K was a man-made bug, nothing alien, or divine, or ancient.  A modern, man-made catastrophe.  Now, was it an act of cyber-war that many were claiming?  That conveniently was not answered in any official capacity.  Even without the internet to fuel the flames, this admission was nothing more than a distraction claimed many.  They took it upon themselves to start a revolution.

I bet you can guess where this is going now…

Categories
awesome computer DIY electronic news internet science video

Cut a Camera in Half

Thanks to the Hydraulic Press Channel, People with access to high power dangerous equipment have an entirely new revenue stream thanks to YouTube videos.  That’s just the premise of the WaterJet Channel, they have a high power water jet that they use to cut things in half.

Just like the HPC, they seem to know a lot about their piece of equipment, but not a lot about what they’re cutting.  However, unlike the HPC, they don’t have that sick accent.

Watch them cut apart an old DSLR, look at all the empty space in it.

{Peta Pixel}

Categories
computer DIY electronic news science video

Listen to Static

Have you ever wanted to hear what static sounds like?  Ever since the days of analog TV went away, kids now don’t know what static is.  Well, with this device, called an Elkctrosluch, you can listen in to the unique static sounds of electromagnetic radiation all around you.

Now after you listened to that, how soon do you think it will be before some group or person puts out a study confirming that electornics cause cancer, or worse, are secretly causing mind-control?  Seriously, have you heard the strange sounds that your phone produces when you just hold it? It’s mind control.  For sure.

In case you want to decode these mind control signals, it’s not difficult to build, but it does require two of pretty much each part, and some soldering abilities.  Here’s a quick YouTube video showing how to put it together:

{MAKE}

Categories
DIY video

Epoxied Wire Art

Epoxy is a magical substance.  You can make all sorts of cool things with it if you’re willing to experiment.  Using some old wires, cat-5, telephone, and plain copper.  They actually look pretty good, especially with the randomness of the wires as they are placed within the epoxy.

I like the Bowl better then the bracelet, which is why I’ve embedded to that video instead of the bracelet.  Look at the distortion through the curved edges of the bowl.  Isn’t that cool looking?  I think so.  It’s not the most environmental friendly way to get rid of this type of stuff, but it is re-using it.

{Hacked Gadgets}

Categories
awesome computer DIY electronic news science

Digital Analog

Bernie Rohde makes clocks.  That’s nothing special to be honest, in the last hundred years or so clock making has gone from being a master level skill, to something overlooked and simple.  Sure, the science of time keeping has advanced greatly over the years, they even decided to add a leap second to the day for some unnecessary reason this evening, probably breaking much of the internet in the process, but making clocks, that’s not that hard anymore, mostly because it can be so forgiving because we have so many other things that we rely on for the accurate time.

clock - 1

Well, Rohde’s clocks are something different.  He started out life as a TV repairman.  Except, in the last decade, TVs have gotten much less repairable, and more consumable.  So his line of work dried up as more and more of the relics from the 70s and 80s were replaced.  He still had many of the various electronic pieces used in the TVs transistors, resistors, capacitors, all the important things.  He decided to use those various electronic pieces to make clocks.

A circular grid of LEDs makes up the face of the clock, then a circuit of these simple resistors, and transistors, and capacitors keeps the time and illuminates the LEDs as the hands of the clock face.  He does all of this by hand, for truly unique, one of a kind art pieces.  No two are alike, but each one is made of the same guts.

I like this blue & green clock below, with the see through face.  But I also like the one above that just takes you back to the 1960s when computers were this complicated and scary and also full of wonder.

Illuminated Clock

{MAKE}

Categories
awesome computer electronic news video

Analog Static

CES was last week.  I bet you knew that.  I bet you saw some of the ace TVs and drones that were all the rage.  I bet you didn’t see this hi-tech, low-tech screen:

It has a resolution of 74,088 mechanical pixels. That sounds impressive, until you do the math and realize that it’s only 588×126.  No 4k here.  It’s limited to a 30fps refresh rate.  Also, it’s only B&W.  And it uses over 3,000 Watts of power when all the dots are being flipped.  It’s still pretty ace though isn’t it?

{Hacked Gadgets|Hackaday}

Categories
computer DIY electronic news internet video

Interactive Chandelier

EDISON from IDEO on Vimeo.

How would you like a Chandelier that’s not really a Chandelier, but more of a grid of light bulbs on strings that move up and down based on 3rd party input.  Be it custom code, or responding to live feedback from the room it’s installed in, or the internetz itself, the bulbs move up and down and get dimmer or brighter based on some custom software written specifically for it.

It’s pretty interesting, but it seems excessive.  And as soon as one light stops working, or one motor burns out, it will start to look crappy, and 2nd rate.  However, that’s the case with most things that aren’t taken care of.  So hopefully this is taken care of.

{Engadget}

Categories
a stumble awesome computer internet microsoft strange video

MS Paint Musical Theater

Soundcloud user R2Bl3nd imported the paint.exe program from Windows 7 x64 into some audio software and interpurted it as an audio file.  Apparently this is called PCM data.  I’ve just discovered what that is and what it means.  But I will boil it down to this.  It interprets the .exe file as audio data.  Digital audio, and then outputs it.  It’s pretty interesting, and all I want to do now is find the software the allows you do do that, and throw every .exe file I have into it.

I’m alittle sketchy on the whole process, and to be honest, I don’t really care that much.

I read some of stallio’s blog post about the process he uses.  Except, it’s far too confusing and complicated, and like I said above, I just don’t care that much.

I think it’s a pretty chill audio track, you should listen to it, then listen to the other ones.  Firefox reminds me of black helicopters. And Windows 7 x64 explorer.exe reminds me of The Imperial MarchiTunes is pretty boring.  I couldn’t find Chrome, or Trillian, or VLC, but I’d like to see/hear them, maybe I should look for how to use those programs.  Maybe someone can give me some better advice.